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Since 1969
Hometown Folks  with Hometown Values
Mattocks Five Inc.
FEED AND FARM SUPPLY / FENCING / ANIMAL HEALTH PRODUCTS / PET FOOD AND SUPPLIES / FOOD PLOT AND SEED MIXES
MEADVILLE FARM & GARDEN
136 Mead Ave.
Meadville, PA 16335
814-724-1083
ALBION MILL
73 Canal Street
Albion, PA 16401
814-756-5291
5-M FEEDS WATERFORD
220  East 3rd Street
Waterford, PA 16441
814-796-4511
5-M TITUSVILLE
217 S. Perry Street
Titusville, PA 16354
814-827-7387
5-M FEEDS WARREN
13393 Rt. 6
Clarendon, PA 16313
814-723-9471

Mattocks 5 News Letter
  Bag Balm is a Vermont-based company that has been making salve since 1899. The company prides itself on the fact that it has been creating the product in a way that has gone unchanged since they first came into existence. Bag Balm is designed to heal chapped skin, keep it soft and healthy, and also is thought to promote healing of abrasions, cuts, and scrapes. Although the company’s products are believed to be safe, anyone with sensitive skin is encouraged to first consult with their skin care specialist. As with any skin care product, Bag Balm could cause an allergic reaction in some people with special sensitivities. The original recipe for Bag Balm was designed to keep cows’ udders soft in the Vermont dairy business, as repeated milking would cause them to become chapped. In 1899, company founder John Norris bought the recipe from a local druggist and then took it to Boston in order to have the company’s new logo designed. In 1937, Bag Balm was used by explorers at the North Pole, who used the product to keep their skin from becoming chapped in the frigid temperatures. The product was also used to soothe the paws of dogs that helped search for survivors during 9/11.
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Osage orange trees are a common sight on the Great Plains today although they were not a widespread member of the prairie community originally. Found primarily in a limited area centered on the Red River valley in southern Oklahoma and northern Texas, they were planted as living fences - or hedges - along the boundaries of farms, and have spread widely from these restricted, linear beginnings. The trees are easily recognized by their glossy, lance-shaped leaves (see illustration), and their short, stout thorns.
The name of the tree comes from the Osage tribe, which lived near the home range of the tree, and the aroma of the fruit after it is ripe. (Find one of the fruit that has been sitting in the sun on a balmy Indian Summer day and notice the pleasant, orange-peel smell of the skin.) Not all of the trees will have fruit because Osage Orange are either male or female, and only the females will bear fruit.

Do Osage Oranges repel insects and spiders?
 Many people believe that the fruit of the Osage Orange will keep insects out of the house. They will gather and place them around basement windows and other likely locations to discourage entry by crickets and other insects. Other people say this only works as long as the fruit is green. (Of course, by the time the fruit is dried up, there will no longer be any bugs trying to get inside!) Other people say it does not work at all. Research at Iowa State University has shown that there are chemical compounds in the fruit that repel cockroaches, although the fruit itself does not. One method that definitely works is to pick up the hedge apple and smash the offending bug with it. That is a sure thing!